Flood revelling in England’s new attack game

England Fly-half Toby Flood has admitted that he is revelling in his new found attacking freedom in the England set-up ahead of the Six Nations clash with Italy.


England waited until the final game of the 2010 Six Nations against France for England to break free of their previously kicking-orientated gameplan but since then they have played some scintillating rugby.


The new England game plan was immediately visible as fullback Ben Foden scored early in the match and England looked on course for victory until the rain came down in Paris.


England have since gone on to win home and away victories against Australia and Flood has been the architect in chief at fly-half.


But the Leicester fly-half says that they cannot get too carried away with playing kamikaze style rugby.


He said: “I feel more comfortable but that’s also been facilitated by the change in tactics.


“We’re in a position now where we want to challenge the opposition. We’re not sitting there thinking: ‘If we kick long we’ll be all right because our defence will hold up.’


“We now feel we can have a massive crack at teams from the outset,” he told Sportsvibe.


“It’ll take a long time to change the stereotype of English rugby but it’s nice to be able to go out and chuck it around a bit because we have the ball players who can do that.


“It’s about making sure you wear the opposition down as much as possible and having the ability to spread it when they are tired.”


England got their 2011 Six Nations campaign off to the best possible start with a 26-19 victory over Wales they will also admit that they were not at their best.


“I don’t think we played well against Wales,” he added. “We did some good things but it wasn’t fantastically brilliant. There’s still a huge amount to work on.


“Johnno (Martin Johnson) wanted to get across to us that we’d made a couple of errors in important parts of the pitch.”


“Our communication let us down a little bit and we let them back into the game from 14 points up, which you can’t do in international rugby.”

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